Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University,Turkey

Keynote: Food By-Products Based Functional Food Powders and Nutraceuticals

Time :

Biography:

Ozlem Tokusoglu has completed her PhD at Ege University Engineering Faculty, Dept of Food Engineering at 2001. She is currently working as Associate Professor Dr  faculty member  in Celal Bayar University  Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. TokuÅŸoÄŸlu performed a visiting scholar at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and  as visiting professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington,USA during  April-May 2010.  She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of selected journals. TokuÅŸoÄŸlu published the scientific edited two international book entitled Fruit and Cereal Bioactives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications  and entitled Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis,USA Publisher,and  third book Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders by CRC Press,too; Dr Tokusoglu also published three national books entitled Cacao and Chocolate Science and Technology ,  Special Fruit Olive: Chemistry, Quality and Technology and Frying Oils Science and Technology.  She organized and/or  administered as Conference Chair  at many conferences and congress in various parts of USA and Europe. 

 

Abstract:

Functional foods are foods that include an ingredient that gives that food health-promoting properties over and above  its usual  nutritional value. Bioactive compounds potentially extractable from the aimed plant food by-products contain majorly phytochemicals, fibers, natural flavor constituents, sugars, polysaccharides, ethanol, and proteins and its derivatives.  The massive by-product, often named as ‘’pomace’’ or  ‘’waste’’, is obtained by fruit or vegetable pressing and can include pulp, peels, seeds and, stones. Major food by-product derivatives from the drink industry (26%), followed by the dairy and ice cream industry (21.3%), the manufacturing and preservation of fruits and vegetables (14.8%), the production of grain and starch products (12.9%), the manufacturing, processing and preservation of meat products (8%), the production of vegetable and animal oils and fats (3.9%), the manufacturing and preservation of fish and fish products (0.4%).

The processing of fruits and vegetables results in high levels of waste materials including peels, seeds, stones, and oilseed meals.  In the innovative technologies, new aspects regarding the utilizing of above-mentioned wastes as by-products for further exploitation on the manufacturing of high-value products, food additives or supplements with high nutritional value.  Especially stone fruits including apple, pear, citrus fruits, grape, tomato, tropical fruits including mango, aggregate fruits including pomegranate, berry fruits, olive and coffee, red beet, artichoke, asparagus, celery, endive, chicory, cucumber, broccoli are important fruit and vegetable sources that are given efficient by-products. By-products of fruit and vegetable as a sources of majorly phenolics and dietary fibre and minerals that have a wide range of action which includes antitumoral, antiviral, antibacterial, cardioprotective and antimutagenic activities.

               The meat by-products contain wastes from bred animals, wastes from seafood, and wastes from dairy processing as thirdly. The recovered biomolecules and by-products can be used to produce functional foods or as adjuvants in food processing or in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. It is determined that many organ meats contain more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) than lean tissue while brain, chitterlings, heart, kidney, liver and lungs contain lowest level of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA)  and the highest level of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Bioactive peptides generally includes between 3-20 amino acid  residues and various bioactives peptides have very healthy owing to to their determined health benefits to the consumers like antihypertensive activity.  Meanwhile collagen and gelatine are unique proteins and collagen is rich in non-polar amino acids (above 80%)  containing  glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), valine (Val), proline (Pro) aminoacids whereas gelatine geerally contains glycine unites, proline and 4-hydroxyproline residues Antioxidant peptides anserine and carnosine are especially bioactive functional ingredient for functional food manufacturing process gained from meat wastes.  It is reported that the major components of fish waste products are tongue, cheeks, stomach, liver from fish. These organs includes protein bioactives as residual, bioactive lipid components (omega 3,6, DHA,EPA), fish skin, carotenoid bioactives.  Chitinous materials from shellfish products, gut enzymes, flavor products, anti-freeze  proteins from seafood blood are crucial. Astaxanthin (3,3-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4-dione) from seafood by-products is a ketocarotenoid oxidized from β-carotene, that  plays biological roles and have a number of special properties for food and medical applications due to their natural ketocarotenoid structure, and liposoluble property, besides has superior antioxidant characteristics and has biological functions as vitamin A precursor.  It is stated that main by-products of dairy industry are whey, buttermilk, and sometimes skim milk. It is reported that whey protein hydrolysates enriched in free amino acids (AAs) and hydrophilic peptides could have been responsible for the rised insulinotropic response of BRIN-BD11 cells. In this context, the potential utilization of whey protein hydrolysates and peptides can be performed as natural complementary approaches in dietary intervention and food-drug therapies for type 2 diabete management by inhibiting DPP IV activity and increasing the half-life of incretin hormones.

            From the nutrition perspective of view, food by-product based functional food powder gaining and nutraceutical manufacturing generate the alternative technologies for healthy and safe bioactive constituent utilization.

 

Biography:

Dr. Jat Rana, who grew up in a small village in the foothills of the Himalayas in India, has a double Major in Chemistry and Botany. He has Masters of Science in Applied Organic Chemistry, Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Birmingham University, England (UK).Post-doctoral fellow at the University of Glasgow Scotland (1981) and USDA Research fellow at University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (1985). Production Manager at the Sigma-Aldrich Corporation in St. Louis, MO (1985-1996). Principle Senior Research Scientist at Amway (1996-2017). In 2017 Dr. Rana joined the Innophos Nutrition group as a Director, Technical Services and Application Development, where he continues to provide his expertise in innovative botanical ingredients. Active member of Society of Cosmetic Chemists (SCC), International Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC), Member of American Chemical Society (ACS), and Asian Congress of Nutrition (ACN). He has chaired and presented at many Scientific Sessions at the National and International events.

 

Abstract:

In recent years role of inflammation in human health has been the subject of considerable study.  Moreover, Inflammation is now recognized as a key factor in virtually all chronic and degenerative diseases, including arthritis, heart disease, asthma, neurodegeneration, cancer, and kidney and bowel diseases. Consumers are more health conscious and are very receptive to use products from natural sources. Cyclooxygenases (COXs) and lipoxygenase (LOX) are prostaglandin synthases and are major players in various inflammatory disorders. There are very little published results on the botanical ingredient which could be used to produce this dual effect (COX/LOX) to mitigate wider spectrum of anti-inflammatory effects.

In our persistent efforts to find botanicals containing bio-active phytochemicals with its capacity to inhibit both COX and LOX resulted in the discovery of a standardized extract from Testa of Anacardium occidentale nut. Our recent findings suggest that CNT extract could provide numerous therapeutic advantages in terms of its anti-inflammatory applications in product development. Use of a series of in vitro high-throughput screening model system, extraction technology, chemical profiling of commercially available CNT samples will be discussed.

 

Keynote Forum

Prakash Kondekar

IndianInstitute of Naturopathy, India

Keynote: Health Care Management

Time : 10:20-11:00

Biography:

Dr Prakash Kondekar(73), BSc (Hons)LLB MD(Homoeo) ND Ayurved-Ratna  FRSH(London)Bowtech(UK)Consultant  Naturopath ,Yoga & Bowen Therapist. Hon Director, Indian Institute of Naturopathy. Visiting Faculty, Mumbai University.Invites,AICR WashingtonDC,INDIA-VIETNAM INVESTMENT ENGAGEMENT  Ho-Chi-Minh City-2013, GFSC Barcelona, St Cloud University Minneapolis-Food Microbiology,2013, Vienna Energy Forum 2015,Indian-Embassy-ROME 2016. Invited by  National University of Natural Medicines-Portland,Bastyr University-Kennmore,A M  Commerce and North Texas,University.

 

Abstract:

    After Air,Food is a substance that is important factor for Health. Now a days water is also defined as a food, by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India. These two are further essential part of Nutrition followed by Health.There are many alternative therapies which also can be useful for Health Management.

Naturopathy,is an art & Science of Non-invasive healthcare & Health assessment in which neither drugs nor Surgery are used.Yoga is based on five Principles.They are,Breathing,Diet,Exercise,Relaxation and Meditation.Many years before,around 200 AD,Patanjali,a sage, composed the Yog-Sutras. The improved flexibility,toning of muscles,endurance,body balance and vitality can be said to be benefits of Yoga. Ayurveda is a traditional medicine system of India.It believes in Body Mind and Spirit,health approach.Health is a state of complete Physical, Mental and social well-being,not merely the absence  disease or infirmity.Thus,for Managing  Health,lifestyle modifications are important factors.

 

Keynote Forum

Alexander V. Oleskin

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia

Keynote: Exogenous and Endogenous Neurochemicals in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis

Time :

Biography:

Alexander V. Oleskin completed two dissertations (for the Ph. D. and the Doctor of Science Degree) at Moscow State University and was awarded the Full Professor (in Biology) title in 2013. His research focus has been on the role of biogenic amines in the interaction between the microbiota, including probiotics, and the host organism. He is currently lecturing on (i) Intercellular Interations, (ii) Microbial Neurochemicals, and (iii) Decentralized Network Structures. He has published several monographs and more than one hundred papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of several local and international scientific journals.          

Abstract:

Lactococci synthesize various kinds of bioactive molecules, such as organic acids, bacteriocins and other antimicrobial agents; they can be safely used in a wide spectrum of food items, biopreservatives, probiotics, and prebiotics.

This work demonstrates that Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains that display antimicrobial activity with respect to test cultures (potential pathogens) synthesize biogenic amines. Strains K-205 and F-116 produce submicromolar amounts of dopamine and its 2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine precursor (DOPA) in a medium that is devoid of dopamine and DOPA.It was also revealed that exogenous neuromediators such as adrenaline (epinephrine), dopamine, and serotonin stimulated the growth and antimicrobial activity of some strains at micromolar concentrations. The growth of L. lactis subsp. lactis strain 194 was threefold accelerated by all the neurotransmitters. The stimulatory effect was observed after 6 and 12 h of cultivation. Epinephrine and serotonin failed to produce a statistically significant effect on the growth of the other tested strains (K-205, 729, and F-116). Among the tested neurochemicals, dopamine exerted the maximum (40%) stimulatory effect on the antimicrobial activity of the L. lactis subsp. lactis  strains with both gram-positive and negative bacteria. However, these strains did not exhibit much antifungal activity: they only insignificantly inhibited the growth of the tested fungal species, presumably because their inhibitory effect was overridden by the stimulatory influence that the neurochemicals are known to exert on fungi.

The data obtained demonstrates that biogenic amines and their metabolites are synthesized by the tested cultures of probiotic gut bacteria. Since these substances are of indisputable physiological and neurological importance, probiotics producing them can potentially be used as target-oriented functional food items for preventive and therapeutic purposes.

 

Biography:

Wojciech Piekoszewski, professor of Medical Sciences with second degree of specialization in Toxicology. He is the head of the Toxicological and Pharmaceutical Analysis Group and the Head of the Laboratory of High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry, of the Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. He is the chief researcher of the laboratory of food biotechnology and pharmaconutriology, FEFU, Vladivostok, Russia. Scientific interests: application of metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics as tools for diagnosis (biomarkers) of mental and neurodegenerative disorders, food safety and security, and analysis of drugs and medicaments in biological materials.

 

Abstract:

The coagulation mechanism and quality characteristics of tofu depend on the choice of coagulant. The effects of using magnesium chloride (MgCl2), calcium sulfate (CaSO4), glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) and fermented soybean whey (FSW) as coagulants for tofu were investigated using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and analysis of textural characteristics and physicochemical properties. The results revealed significant differences (P <0.05) in the moisture contents, yields, protein contents and amino acid contents of tofu samples prepared using the four coagulants. GDL tofu exhibited the highest yield (202 g/100g) and moisture content (76.3%). FSW tofu had the highest protein content (18.5%) and amino acid content (15.85%). In terms of the textural properties, hardness, chewiness and gumminess were significantly affected by the choice of coagulant. GC×GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 49, 44, 55 and 63 flavour substances in the tofu samples prepared using MgCl2, CaSO4, GDL and FSW, respectively. In sensory evaluation tests, GDL tofu was reported to possess a smooth surface and white colour. The microstructure of FSW tofu was dense and uniform. The results of this study demonstrate that the quality of tofu is affected by the choice of coagulant. An evaluation method was established based on relevant characteristics to determine the differences in the properties of tofu samples produced using the various coagulants.

 

  • Nutraceuticals
Location: 1

Session Introduction

Everton Flemmings

Global CBD Research and Policy Inspectorate , Jamaica

Title: HOLISTIC WELLNESS- From Alternative Traditional Nutraceutical and Medicinal Plants
Biography:

Dr Everton Flemmings’ passion is into the provision of alternative traditional medicine for care of various illnesses that were long cared for by our forefathers, using herbs and medicinal plants. He has built a repertoire of medicinal plant based research from which he creates a line of products that are used to treat common illnesses and combat life threatening diseases. He currently is developing an holistic and wellness farm in Jamaica.

 

Abstract:

Nutraceutical and Medicinal Plants as alternative to Opiods. It has been researched and confirmed through many stages of medical reviews that plants such as Neem leaves are popular in the traditional medicine world. They are famously known as multi-talented medicine. They contain substances that work perfectly well to heal various illnesses, from the most trivial illness until the most serious one. Our immunity system will definitely increase if we are in our best shape. This is because our blood brings oxygen optimally so that the toxic can be discharged and neutralized faster. This can increase our immunity system so that it is able to combat the pathogen and another destructive substances.

 

Soursop leaves are the most beneficial parts of this tree. They have the Acetoginin containing compounds namely bulatacin, asimisin and squamosin. Acetoginin acts as an anti-feedent. Thus, they are often used in killing insects and pests which die by consuming these leaves even in small amounts. Scientific research conducted by The National Cancer Institute has proved that Soursop leaves can effectively attack and destroy cancer cells. In addition to this, they are also used in the treatment of several other diseases.Moringa leaves are the most nutritious part of the plant, being a significant source of B vitamins, vitamin C, provitamin A as beta-carotene, vitamin K, manganese, and protein, among other essential nutrients. When compared with common foods particularly high in certain nutrients per 100 g fresh weight, cooked moringa leaves are considerable sources of these same nutrients. The Guinea Hen weed benefits people all across the world but it grows in Jamaica. If combating cancer wasn’t enough, the Guinea Hen weed benefits are also showing to combat different degenerative diseases too. Diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s which are both very devastating if not treated. Other diseases like Arthritis and diabetes are life long and can put a lot of strain on a person, another guinea hen weed benefit is that it has been found affective in helping with these diseases. It has an effect on Diabetes in particular because it has been proven to lower blood sugar levels.


 

  • Nutrition and Health
Location: 2
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Michael Ezekwe (Ph.D.) is a professor of Animal Science and director of Swine Patent awards.  Dr. Ezekwe is involved in OICI-International livestock improvement project activities in Africa.  He has conducted technology transfer training workshops in Ghana, Gambia, and Nigeria under the auspices of the US AID-OICI International.  He has collaborated with North-South Institute Inc.; Davie, Florida, on livestock improvement projects in the US Virgin Islands territory and island of St. Thomas.  Development Center at Alcorn State University.  He is a trained animal nutritionist and has worked with swine, goat, and poultry in the area of feed utilization, growth, and development.     He is involved in human as well as swine nutrition research projects, which are supported by USDA-NIFA and ARS.  He has published referred journals.  He also conducted research involving vegetable purslane and waterleaf and their unique omega-3 fatty acid content.  His research has earned him three U.S.

 

Abstract:

Njangsa (Ricinodendron heudelotii), a tropical tree that grows in the forest of West and Central Africa, produces fruits that are manually shelled to collect oil seeds and dried.  A compositional analysis of njangsa revealed a unique nutrient presence of long chain omeg-3 fatty acids not usually associated with plant materials.  The seed had 31.4% crude protein and 44.7% lipid.  Of this lipid, about 73% was composed of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), almost entirely of eicosapentaenoic acid, with about 18% oleic acid.  Preliminary studies were conducted to determine if njangsa seed meal would alter the lipid and other metabolite levels in the pig and/or improve pork quality traits.  Twelve crossbred gilts and barrows were fed corn-soybean diets containing 14% crude protein.  Treatment group was supplemented with 2% njangsa oil seed meal.  Growth and carcass traits showed similar carcass characteristics (P>0.05).  Backfat measurement was reduced (P<0.05), while kidney weight was elevated (P<0.01) in treated animals.  Pork sensory evaluation were not different between the experimental groups.  Oil rich supply of long chain PUFA from sources other than seafood may provide a more sustainable source, capable of reducing children and adult obesity.

 

  • Functional Foods
Location: 3

Session Introduction

Ney Felipe Fernandes

Nutricao Avancada, Brazil

Title: ACAI – The Brazilian berrie and it´s molecular targets

Time : 02:20-02:50

Speaker
Biography:

Nutritionist, Master in Molecular Biology (Universidade Federal do Paraná), Specialist in Exercise Physiology (Universidade Veiga de Almeida- Rio de Janeiro), Nutrição Avançada Owner, Author of the book "Sports Nutrition - Myths and Truths

Abstract:

Açaí, a word of Tupi Guarani origin (yasa'i) meaning "weeping fruit" is the fruit of the Euterpe oleracea palm tree, native to the Amazon rainforest, in South America. Commercially sold acai is extracted by maceration and extraction of its pulp containing carbohydrates, lipids (mainly oleic acid), fibers and proteins. But as in the nutritional sciences we should not look only at the tip of the iceberg, that is, the macronutrients, we must look at what is immersed, what is more important and what is sometimes not seen with the naked eye: its phytochemical ponts. When speaking of longevity, the eyes must be focused mainly on two physiological aspects: reduction of subclinical basal inflammation and attenuation of oxidative stress.  It is probably in these two aspects (oxidative stress and inflammation) that açaí (whether consumed in the form of fruit in natura or juice or pulp) can contribute to human health. The coloration of açaí is due to the presence of a large amount of anthocyanins. The most predominant anthocyanins in açaí are cyanidin 3-O-rutinoside and cyanidin 3-O-glycoside (C-3-O) that has correlation with improvement inflammatory indicators (TNF-alpha, NfkB) an increase in the expression of Nrf2. Also velutin (flavone isolated from açaí pulp) may have an anti-inflammatory role, since it was able to modulate TNF and NfKB levels in vitro. In another study, açaí was able to modulate the activity of TLR4 receptors, thus impacting other inflammatory markers (VCAM, ICAM, TNF-alpha, NfkB). We can not say that we would obtain safe and desirable results from anthocyanins by simply consuming the açaí that is marketed (and usually not its fresh fruit) Nor can we, as we know, claim that a given functional food cures certain disease. However, it is prudent to work with the idea of ​​'chronic, regular ingestion' to promote longevity. 


 

  • Recent trends in Nutraceuticals Research
Location: 4
Speaker
Biography:

Abdeen Mustafa Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Energy Research Institute (ERI). He obtained both his PhD degree in the Built Environment and Master of Philosophy degree in Renewable Energy Technologies from the University of Nottingham. He is qualified Mechanical Engineer with a proven track record within the water industry and renewable energy technologies. He has been graduated from University of El Menoufia, Egypt, BSc in Mechanical Engineering. His previous experience involved being a member of the research team at the National Council for Research/Energy Research Institute in Sudan and working director of research and development for National Water Equipment Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO’S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 7 books and 150 chapters in books.

                                                                                                                                                  

Abstract:

The move towards a de-carbonised world, driven partly by climate science and partly by the business opportunities it offers, will need the promotion of environmentally friendly alternatives, if an acceptable stabilisation level of atmospheric carbon dioxide is to be achieved. This requires the harnessing and use of natural resources that produce no air pollution or greenhouse gases and provides comfortable coexistence of human, livestock, and plants. This study reviews the energy-using technologies based on natural resources, which are available to and applicable in the farming industry. Among these are greenhouses, which are necessary for the growth of some plants (i.e., vegetables, flowers, etc.) in severe climates. However, greenhouses require some air conditioning process to control their temperature and relative humidity to suit specific plants. To achieve this, a novel air humidifier and/or dehumidifier systems using mop fans had been designed and employed in an experimental greenhouse to evaluate its performance under a controlled environment. This device helped to reduce the energy consumption of the greenhouse whilst providing a pleasant environment for the plants inside the greenhouse. The system was designed taking into account the meteorological conditions, which affect the environment inside the greenhouse. The performance of the system was monitored over a period of time by measuring the temperature and relative humidity of the greenhouse. Results of the monitoring have shown that the system was able to provide comfortable conditions (temperatures of 16-26oC and relative humidity of 65%) suitable for the plants grown in the experimental greenhouse. It also enabled the minimisation of temperature variation and, hence, avoided the hazard of any sudden climatic change inside the greenhouse.

 

  • Nutraceuticals in Diabetes mellitus
Location: 5

Session Introduction

Lama Alnaeli

Wellness by Design, Dubai Healthcare City

Title: Nutrition role in prevention and cure diseases
Speaker
Biography:

Besides being the Brand Health Ambassador for many famous companies, She is the official Health and Diet Speaker for more than 10 local and International TV & radio channels. Her weekly columns in Arabic magazines and newspapers along with her daily social media postings are followed by thousands of people from the region. 

Abstract:

Starting with some statistics from the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) which reports that chronic diseases are leading causes of death and disability, 70% of annual deaths are due to chronic diseases. These preventable conditions not only compromise quality of life, they add to rising health care costs (75% of the healthcare cost). 

The good news is that we have the power to help prevent chronic disease, as making positive diet and lifestyle changes can help reduce risk. Eating healthy foods, getting enough exercise, and refraining from tobacco and excessive alcohol use confer numerous health benefits; including possibly preventing the onset of chronic diseases.

A study from the Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition in Harvard school of public health was done to assess the epidemiological evidence on diet and cancer and make public health recommendations.

They found that:

-  Overweight/obesity increases the risk for cancers of the oesophagus (adenocarcinoma), colorectal, breast (postmenopausal), endometrium and kidney and it was recommended that the body weight should be maintained in the body mass index range of 18.5-25 kg/m2, and weight gain in adulthood avoided.

- High Salt intake may possibly lead to stomach cancer; that's why it is highly recommended that we watch out our consumption of salt preserved foods.

- Scalding Hot drinks and foods may possibly increase the risk of oral cavity, pharynx and oesophagus cancer; hence it's recommended that the temperature of our intakes should always be moderate.

- Physical activity, the main determinant of energy expenditure, reduces the risk for colorectal cancer and reduces the risk for breast cancer; regular physical activity is highly advised.

Furthermore there are recent findings that food-based guidelines are reflected in specific dietary approaches to improve cardiovascular risk factors, such as the dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet and therapeutic Lifestyle changes, which have shown effectively, benefit hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, respectively. These diets, therefore, significantly reduce coronary heart disease risk and are effective in decreasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality risk.

To conclude, a healthy lifestyle and a good balanced diet are the key of healthy living. Medical nutrition therapy plays a key role not only in curing diseases, but also in preventing it.

 

  • Nutraceuticals Market-Growth Trends
Location: 6
  • Dietary Supplements and Dietary Fibers
Location: 7
Biography:

.

Abstract:

FenuLean (Fenugreek flakes) is a proprietary product of Bio-gen Extracts Ltd. was de-fatted and de-bitterized fibres with a high fibre content of ≥ 50% of which 20-25% are soluble fibres and 30-35% are insoluble fibres.The bulking and viscosity properties of dietary fibre in the stomach are predominantly responsible for influencing satiation and satiety which in turn are the key indicators in the weight management program In the pilot and pivotal study conducted FenuLean, taken thirty minutes prior to meal, effectively suppress the appetite by initiating the sense of satiety, reduction of hunger, feeling of fullness, desire to consume food and prospective need to consume food. Fibre rich foods usually are accompanied by increased efforts and/or time of mastication, which leads to increased satiety through a reduction in rate of ingestion. It makes a good replacement for conventional products in number of bakery items.

Interestingly soluble fibre derived from FenuLean has been identified chemically as galactomannans just like other fibre of guar seeds or psyllium husk. Interestingly the ratio of mannose to galactose in the FenuLean is 1:1 making it superior in terms of its gel-forming characteristic over other galactomannans.  Interestingly we found changes in the post prandial glucose response and this could be attributed to the increasing the viscosity of digested food in the gut, these fibres, especially of fenugreek origin, delay the absorption of carbohydrates. Considering the significant amounts of galactomannans in fenugreek seeds, it is of utmost importance that the effects of these in the control of postprandial glycemia and its response to weight management. Our studies using FenuLean showed growing evidence in the literature that fenugreek fibres can improve glucose homeostasis by delaying carbohydrate digestion and absorption and enhancing insulin action.

Primary aim of our study was to examine the effects of  FenuLean  from fenugreek at 10g and 5g on satiety and fullness, and on reduced ratings of hunger, desire and prospective food consumption. Secondary objective was to determine FenuLean at the same doses from fenugreek would reduce glycemic and insulin response apart from the palatability. The investigational product (IP) contained FenuLean 5 g and 10 g. FenuLean 5 g / 10 g was consumed orally with water along with a standard meal (breakfast).

FenuLean 5g & 10 g consumption lead to improvement in

  • Overall satiety of the healthy subjects
  • Increased satisfied satiety and higher fullness was observed
  • Reduced hunger, desire to consume food and prospective food consumption
  • Satiety satisfaction and fullness scores increased from thirty minutes post consumption
  •  Positive trend of reduction in serum insulin after consumption
  • Overall, palatability of the FenuLean 5 and 10 g was found to be comparable.

Viscous and gel-forming property of soluble dietary fibre inhibit macronutrient absorption, reduce postprandial glucose response and may benefit some changes in the body metabolism. However, in our study the increase in satiety was not related to reduced absorption of glucose as our study did not find any effects of FenuLean on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Healthy volunteers do not show changes in post prandial glucose concentration(s) even post consumption of fibre which is a good sign of maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Currently we are investigating whether FenuLean in over 100 subjects would have significant effects on postprandial blood glucose response to a larger meal or high energy meal or subjects with high BMI. The effects on appetite suppression and food intake suggest that FenuLean (fenugreek flakes) may have a role in the control of food intake in normal individuals.

 

Day 2 :

Biography:

I am a professional nutritionist having a solid background of human nutrition as my higher education. With more than 7 years of experience in different nutrition specific projects at different positions (District Project Manager, District Team Leader, District Nutrition Coordinator, Nutrition Expert, District Nutrition Training Coordinator, Nutritionist) I have also been faculty member of Mardan Institute of Sciences for almost 4 years, Mardan (KPK, Pakistan) where I attended nutrition classes to students of MPH (Master in Public Health). Apart from all the above mentioned experiences and expertise I am having passion for treatment-via-food. The above said research came after a long struggle while growing up in such a community, which never had a chance to review their life risk as most of the community, considered it as a general health problem. The results of the said research are almost 70% in agreement to other researchers, who studied the same disease with different risk factors.

 

Abstract:

A study was carried out, in order to assess the risk factors associated with type-II diabetes mellitus in males (Age≥40 years) in district Mardan. Four hundred cases and controls (Each 200) were selected from 10 union councils (7 rural and 3 urban) by a systematic sampling method. In order to select cases and controls, all were interviewed for medical history, on fulfillment of which, cases and controls were separately included for study. In anthropometry, weight, and height were taken for Body Mass Index while waist and hip circumference were taken for waist-to-hip ratio. Fasting blood sugar of cases and controls was determined with the glucometer. Cases and controls were interviewed with Food frequency questionnaire and other questionnaires in order to assess the demographic and socioeconomic characters of the families. The results disclosed that most of the cases had family history of diabetes. In addition to that, cases were also found to have higher (p<0.05) average weight, height and body mass index, and fasting blood sugar level to those of controls. These results also revealed that there was a distinguished (p<0.05) association between dairy and fruit with the health status and about 1/3rd of both cases and controls had satisfactory consumption of dairy and fruit only. A significant link was found among family size, exercise, type of exercise, duration of exercise, watching television, duration of watching television and the status of disease. The study revealed that a combination of anthropometric, dietary and demographic variables were associated with type-II diabetes mellitus in male adult population of district Mardan.

  • Functional Foods
Location: 1

Session Introduction

Farhan Saeed

Government college university Faisalabad,Pakistan

Title: Probing the Storage Stability and Sensorial Properties of Cereal Grass Functional Drinks
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Farhan has completed his PhD at the age of 28 years from University of Agriculture, Faisalabad-Pakistan and postdoctoral studies from University of Queensland, Brisbane Australia. He is working as Assistant Professor, Government College University Faisalabad-Pakistan. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals with impact factor more than 100. He has 08 book chapters in international books and he also got two research funds from Higher Education Commission Islamabad Pakistan.        

Abstract:

The present research study was designed for the development of functional drinks from wheat and barley grasses followed by their physicochemical and sensorial characterization. For the purpose, wheat and barley grasses were procured from Ayub Agriculture Research Institute, Faisalabad-Pakistan. In 1st phase, functional drinks i.e. wheat grass and barley grass drinks were prepared with different concentrations and were subjected for physicochemical analysis and sensorial evaluation. Moreover, these drinks were analyzed for color indices, pH, acidity and total soluble solids (TSS) during storage study at 0, 2, 4 and 6 days. In addition, data obtained for each parameter was subjected for appropriate statistical design for determining the level of significance. Results explored that total soluble solids and pH of drinks/juices were 1.321, 2.8900, 3.100 & 6.225, 6.032, 6.491 for T0, T1 and T2, respectively whereas a slight decreasing trend in acidity was observed during storage. Furthermore, treatments and storage (days) showed non-significant effect on these traits however, storage affected significantly except for a* value for color indices. With respect to sensory aspects, the cereal grass drinks/juices showed satisfactory indexes of acceptability and promising marketing potential.

 

  • Prebiotic and Probiotics
Location: 2

Session Introduction

Bushra Niaz

Government College University Faisalabad,Pakistan

Title: EXPLORING THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF CAMEL MILK ON BACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF E.COLI, S.AUREUS, AND SALMONELLA
Biography:

Dr. Bushra Niaz is working Assistant Professor in Institute of Home & Food Sciences, Government College University Faisalabad-Pakistan. She has 22 publications and having 30 impact factor. She did work on functional foods during her phd study

 

Abstract:

Globally, the use of dairy and meat commodities owing to its rich nutritional profile and palatability is obvious. Milk and meat are considered as a complete nutritional product that satisfies the basic requirement of masses around the globe. Its demand and consumption vary on the basis of traditional values and lifestyle habits. According to the production potential, Camel milk is ranked lower as compared to other milking animals. Nevertheless, camel milk is preferably used due to its significant contribution towards human nutrition and socioeconomic uplift. There was a dire need to shift the consumer trend towards camel milk containing an array of functional ingredients that promotes health. The study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effect of camel milk on bacterial activity of E.coli, S.aureus, and salmonella. For that, proximate compositional analysis was done of the camel milk from local market. Afterwards, isolation of different meat bacteria i.e., E.coli, S.aureus, and salmonella was carried out which then grew separately and they were treated with camel milk at different temperature ranges i.e., 25, 65, 75, 90 and 120°C to check its activity on bacterial growth and final research data was subjected to statistical analysis. Conclusively, this research findings of present research is very helpful for utilization of camel milk as a alternative and totally safe preservative for storage of different food commodities especially meat and its products.

 

  • Nutrition and Health
Location: 3
Speaker
Biography:

Oluyinka Mary Amos-Awoniyi, hails from Osun State, Nigeria. A 33 years old PhD student of Microbiology at the University of Zululand, South Africa. I have published about three journal articles with about 500 reads and citations. Three of my research papers have been submitted for publications. She is serving as a reviewer and editorial board member for Asian Food Science Journal, Cient Periodique Journals (CPQ) and Acta Scientific Nutrition health Journal. My Current research topic is “Alcoholic and lactic acid fermentation of finger millet and its potential for clear beer/ probiotics food beverage”. My area of research interests are Nutrition, Food processing and Food Microbiology.

 

Abstract:

Malting is the process of germinating cereal grains under controlled conditions with the aim of activating endogenous hydrolytic enzymes, majorly α-amylase. This study investigated the optimal finger millet seed germination temperature for amylase activity in finger millet malt. Finger millet seed were germinated at various temperatures ranges (15 ºC, 25 ºC and 35 ºC) for five consecutive days. Samples were withdrawn daily at an interval of 24 h and kilned at 30 ºC and 40 ºC respectively. Radicles developments were monitored with measuring ruler, and amylase activity was determined with starch solution following standard protocols. The results revealed that radicle development of finger millet increased with germination time. However, seed germinated at 25 ºC and kilned at 30 ºC showed significant (P < 0.05) better radicle development than others germinated at 15 ºC and 35 ºC respectively. Similarly, seed germinated at 25 ºC and kilned at 30 ºC also showed the highest amylase activity than other counterparts. It is apparent that the optimal condition suitable for effective malting of finger millet was at 25 ºC germination and kilned at 30 ºC. For further studies, the nutritional and chemical composition of finger millet malt will be evaluated.

 

  • Nutraceuticals in Healthcare
Location: 4

Session Introduction

Seema Sonkar

Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture and Technology,INDIA.

Title: Development and Standardization of Nutraceutical Food Products Fortified with Beet root
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Seema Sonkar is Assistant professor at the C.S. Azad University Kanpur, area of specialization in Food nutrition.she guided M.sc student thesis more than 35 as a major guide and more than 40 students of M.scand 5phd as a co guide.she attended ten national five international conference in India and presented paper in international conference at Malaysia, Poland and Germany. She published three books- basic concept of micronutrients in human nutrition, Diet and nutrition counselling, dietetic food and food and nutrition security challenge towards malnutrition, four manuals.  Two project from state government. Received award in excellence in teaching and young scientist award.

 

Abstract:

 The nutraceutical is a term derived from nutrition and pharmaceuticals. Nutraceutical are product other than nutrition is also used as medicine.Nutraceutucal product may be define as as a substance, which has physiological benefits provide against chronic disease. The potential of nutraceutical procts mitigating human health problems.Developed country also face the problem of high energy food and unbalance diet. These innovative functional foods offer high impact to reducing poverty and unger.Great potential for acieving sustained improvements in the nutritional status of poor. In this research work three product prepared in three treatment.T1 was best in soup mix,T2 was good in cookies and T3 was acceptable in extruded product.  Iron content oin soup mix 461.25ppm was higher than two products.The products prepared with carrot and beet root was good in iron,zinc and protein for health.

Key words- Beet root, nutraceutical food, carrot, nutritional security

  • Role of Functional Foods
Location: 5

Session Introduction

Sameera A. Rege

Institute of Chemical Technology, India.

Title: Nutritious Butter like products
Biography:

Dr. Sameera A. Rege is a research student of Prof. Shamim A. Momin. Prof.Shamim A. Momin is a retired professor and Head from the department of Oils, Oleochemicals and Surfactants Technology from Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, India. She has an experience of teaching and research for about 25 years. Her areas of interest are Vegetable oils, Nutraceuticals, Functional food, Surfactants, Cosmetics and Perfumery. Under her guidance, Dr. Rege has carried out research in the field of Vegetable oils, Nutraceuticals and Functional food. Together, they have worked mainly for the stabilization of essential fatty acids using natural antioxidants. They were first to utilize antioxidant activity of curcuminoids in refined sunflower oil. Dr. Rege has a teaching experience of about 8 years. The research work, they have carried out is cited by other scientists and found useful in carrying out the further research

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: Nutraceuticals are biologically active phytochemicals that provide medicinal benefits. Essential fatty acids such as linoleic, linolenic acid are considered as nutraceuticals, as they are involved in number of crucial functions in human body. However, they cannot be synthesized in the body. Hence, needs to be provided through certain diet products such as butter like products, fish oil, linseed oil etc. These essential fatty acids are highly unstable and undergo oxidation due to their chemical structure. Hence antioxidants needs to be used to prevent the oxidation. Natural antioxidants are preferred over synthetic antioxidants because of their medicinal benefits. Moreover, natural antioxidants are safe and does not have limit for its use unlike synthetic antioxidants. So far no work has been reported to use essential fatty acids and natural antioxidants in formulating butter like products, hence a detailed investigation was done in formulation such products, which can provide supplements and micronutrients to the consumers.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: In our study, butter like products were formulated using hydrogenated fat, water and vegetable oil containing essential fatty acids. Sunflower oil was used as a source of essential fatty acids. Natural antioxidants were added to restore the nutritive value of essential fatty acids. Glycerol monostearate was used as an emulsifier. The effect of variation of sunflower oil and hydrogenated fat as well as the added natural antioxidants was studied. The products were analysed for the rheological properties such as slipping point, dropping point, spreadability along with their oxidative stability.

Conclusion & Significance: The study indicates that butter like products containing essential fatty acids and natural antioxidant showed remarkable oxidative stability. Moreover, the products displayed acceptable rheological properties. Thus, consumers can gain advantage of essential fatty acids and the therapeutic benefits of the added natural antioxidants by consuming such product.

 

  • Bioactive Nutraceuticals
Location: 6
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Achilonu has specialization in Organic Chemistry Synthesis with passion in phytochemical extraction, isolation, and compound modification to improve the bioactivity of the isolated phytochemical. He has synthesised some novel products that are patented (US 8, 501, 970 B2 and US 9,296,717 B2) and a major contributor to the third patent (US 9 181 293 B2). His current research interest is to bring bioactive phytocompounds to bear to health. Hence, he is investigating the modulatory effects of bioactive phytochemicals on animals fed rations fortified with medicinal plant materials, intending to improve the reproductive systems, general wellbeing of the livestock as well as the quality of the animal products.

Abstract:

Indigenous fruits complements the diet of many rural poor households; providing therapeutic needs, vital nutrients and food security as well. The multipurpose indigenous plants are being threatened by both depletion and wastage of the fruits in the wild, hence the need to identify ways of utilizing all parts of the plant for better nutritional and medicinal benefits. Some of the selected South African local wild plants (Annona senegalensis, Carissa macrocarpa, Vangueria infausta, Englerophytum magalismontanum) are widely distributed within the coastal region and commonly consumed by the rural populace. Most parts of the plants (root, stem, leaves and fruits) are used by the local communities to treat several ailments. The stem-barks are used as anthelmintic, treatment of diarrhea, toothache and respiratory infections. The leaves treats pneumonia. The roots treats stomach-ache, venereal diseases, chest colds and dizziness. The ripe fruits are palatable and made into various local food types, while some of the unripe fruits are used traditionally in treating chicken pox. Studies have established that the plants’ phytochemical extracts exhibit anti-oxidant, antimicrobial, antidiarrheal, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anticonvulsant, antimalarial, and anti-snake venom properties, which positively impact  on appetite, growth and the immune status of the consumers. The bioactive components of the plant parts accessed by bioassay directed chromatographic fractionation, toxicological analysis and nutritional evaluation is done on the fractions. The bioactive fractions are used to enrich different fruit products to afford the required fruit supplements.  The products are purported to be self-preserving, have improved therapeutic/nutritional qualities, contributes to solving the problem of micronutrient deficiencies: mitigate malnutrition, prevent and/or ameliorate the impacts of diet-related and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetics, cancer, and their associated effects on age and memory decline.

  • Restorative & Alternative Medicine
Location: 7
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Chioma A. Anosike is a senior lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry. She graduated from the Department of Biochemistry, University of Nigeria, Nsukka in 1998, obtained her M.Sc in Pharmacological Biochemistry in 2004 and Ph.D in Nutritional and Pharmacological Biochemistry, University of Nigeria, Nsukka in 2011. Her research interests and activities are on plants used for human nutrition and their potential roles in the treatment and management of immunological and inflammatory diseases.

 

Abstract:

Sickle cell disease (SCD), a major problem of the developing world is an inherited disorder of haemoglobin, with clinical manifestations attributed to a point mutation in the amino acid globin chain of haemoglobin A by the substitution of a hydrophilic glutamic acid residue for a hydrophobic valine residue, at the sixth position of the β-chain of haemoglobin molecule. Due to the high mortality rate of sickle cell patients, especially in children, the search for rational drug development that must embrace not only synthetic drugs but also natural products with anti-sickling and erythrocyte membrane stabilizing potentials is of particular interest. Sphenostylis stenocarpa is a legume rich in proteins and amino acids some of which have antisickling properties. It abounds in tropical Africa especially Nigeria.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation:

This research investigated aqueous extract of Sphenostylis stenocarpa seeds for possible in-vitro antisickling properties. Homozygous SS blood samples obtained from patients were washed thrice in phosphate buffered saline to obtain the red blood cells pre-incubated with 2, 4 and 6mg/ml concentrations of the extract and para-hydroxybenzoic acid as the standard. Induction of sickling and polymerization of HbSS was done by addition of 2 % metabisulphite (Na2S2O2) solution. Microscopic analysis of the effect of varied concentrations of the extract on the sickling of SS erythrocytes was done. A plot of percentage sickling inhibition against extract concentration was obtained.

Findings:

The extract showed high percentage inhibition of polymerization of sickle RBCs when compared with the standard (P-hydroxybenzoic acid). The extract also increased membrane stabilization and inhibition of sickled RBCs hemolysis. Amino acid profile of the legume showed high concentration of some antisickling amino acids such as phenylalanine, lysine, asparagines, serine and arginine.

Conclusion & Significance: The legume has immense nutritional and therapeutic importance in the management of sickle cell disease